Batman Forever

It's all about branding today.

As a vehicle to sales, you could make a strong case for the power of branding actually being more important than the product itself today.

My branding  history began as a founding partner at what later became Meade Ullman Advertising. One of our cache' clients was Warner Brothers Consumer Products (formerly Licensing Corporation of America), the licensing industry leader.  We handled their trade advertising; producing ads and literature to sell through to McDonald's, Mattel, etc. for promotional tie-ins. Before the 1995 movie release, the Batman Forever logo went to number one worldwide beyond Snoopy and Mickey Mouse. 

My most significant branding experience was the launching of Packard Bell. Meade Ullman Advertising made the front page of Ad Week upon landing the highly sought-after, launch campaign.

Rather than using the existing company name, and having to build branding awareness, on top of product promotions, we purchased a powerful, yet dormant name.

Packard Bell's business plan strategy was a tour de force, an industry game-changer that is now the standard. They packaged computers ready to plug-in and play out of the box. And sold them through mass market retailers.

Prior to that, high tech boutiques had the computer market and they would build to sell. Packard Bell grew to number one worldwide in two years, prior to being bought out by NEC.

On a local level, we handled the Tim Conway Celebrity Golf Benefit in the late seventies. And United Way of Ventura County as a pro bono client.  As a freelance marketing consultant, I managed the re-branding of the struggling Westlake Hills Plaza at the corner of Westlake and Thousand Oaks Boulevards and re-branded it as North Ranch Mall.

Currently, I have a marketing idea for a portion of TO Boulevard that is entirely out of the downtown district boundaries. It will be second only to the downtown revitalization plan itself.